Archive for November, 2004

Food allergy vaccine success on dogs – a first!

Posted by SB Anderson on November 23rd, 2004

A research team led by a Stanford University School of Medicine scientist has developed vaccines that vastly reduce or eliminate dogs’ allergic reactions to three major food allergens: peanuts, milk and wheat. The vaccines’ benefits lasted at least three months. The research, published in the Nov. 12 online edition of the journal “Allergy” and completed jointly with scientists at UC-San Francisco, UC-Davis and UC-Berkeley, is the first to reverse pre-existing food allergies in an animal other than a mouse. Read this Business Wire story

Check out the BBC News, UK Edition’s take on this research development here

Read the Science Daily story on this development here

Iowa hospital hopes to open food allergy clinic

Posted by SB Anderson on November 23rd, 2004

Officials at University of Iowa Hospitals hope to open a new clinic soon to address issues surrounding food allergies. The new clinic will bring together food allergy experts from the hospital’s divisions of pediatric allergies and allergy-immunology. Read more here

Site offers clinical trial information

Posted by SB Anderson on November 23rd, 2004

Centerwatch.com, a clinical trials listing service, offers links to information on a variety of trials. Check out the allergy trials, including the Xolair/peanut allergy study and other allergy and asthma studies, here

UK site offers recipes for special diets

Posted by SB Anderson on November 23rd, 2004

Looking for yummy recipes that will appeal to the whole family, even if one of you has a food allergy or is following a vegetarian diet? Check out Pure Spreads website, where you’ll find recipes under several categories, including dairy free, gluten free, egg free, vegetarian and vegan. In addition to a variety of recipes, the UK site offers product information on its dairy-free, gluten-free spreads. Check out the details here

Directory IDs medication with gluten, lactose and iodine

Posted by SB Anderson on November 23rd, 2004

“A Guide Through the Medicine Cabinet,” a comprehensive, 400-page directory, updated annually, enables those avoiding gluten, as well as lactose and iodine, to easily identify prescription drugs to avoid. Armed with the information in the guide, doctors can make informed decisions about the medications they prescribe for celiac patients. The directory was developed by a New Jersey woman in 1998. Read more here

New label law may confuse food allergic folks

Posted by SB Anderson on November 18th, 2004

The new ingredient label law may actually cause people with food allergies some confusion, according to Steve Taylor, professor and chair of Food Science and Technology at the University of Nebraska. Taylor has been researching the amount of allergen that causes a reaction for many years; however, I’d like to point out that he’s not an allergist. His point is that the new law requires manufacturers to include even the smallest amount of ingredients on the label if it’s in the product. For some people, a minute amount may have no effect on them, but if they are practicing strict avoidance, they may avoid the product. However, I would argue, some people actually react to minute amounts (even trace elements of a protein) and would be greatly helped by the new law. Taylor says if the person has been eating this product for years and suddenly sees the allergen they must avoid on the label, they will avoid the product. I say call the manufacturer like I’ve been doing for my son (anaphylactic to milk) for nearly 12 years! Having the total list of ingredients (however small the amount) is necessary and overdue. But if you are curious about what he has to say, read more here

Professor says label law may confuse food allergic folks

Posted by SB Anderson on November 18th, 2004

The new ingredient label law may actually cause people with food allergies some confusion, according to Steve Taylor, professor and chair of Food Science and Technology at the University of Nebraska. Taylor has been researching the amount of allergen that causes a reaction for many years; however, I’d like to point out that he’s not an allergist. His point is that the new law requires manufacturers to include even the smallest amount of ingredients on the label if it’s in the product. For some people, a minute amount may have no effect on them, but if they are practicing strict avoidance, they may avoid the product. However, I would argue, some people actually react to minute amounts (even trace elements of a protein) and would be greatly helped by the new law. Taylor says if the person has been eating this product for years and suddenly sees the allergen they must avoid on the label, they will avoid the product. I say call the manufacturer like I’ve been doing for my son (anaphylactic to milk) for nearly 12 years! Having the total list of ingredients (however small the amount) is necessary and overdue. The professor is the one confusing me, but if you’re curious about what he has to say, read more here

Outgrown peanut allergy? Eat ‘em or risk allergy returning

Posted by SB Anderson on November 18th, 2004

If your child has outgrown his allergy to peanuts, make sure he eats something with peanuts in it at least once a month. Otherwise, a new study has found, your child’s allergy may rear its ugly head again. Researchers suggest that the same may hold true for other severe food allergies. The difference is that if you outgrow a milk allergy, even without drinking a glass of milk each month, you’re very likely to ingest milk proteins on a regular basis. The study was conducted by Dr. Hugh Sampson at Johns Hopkins University and was published in the November issue of the Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology. Read details here

Young man dies during celebratory dinner

Posted by SB Anderson on November 18th, 2004

A 19-year-old UK man died of cardiac arrest, precipitated by anaphylaxis, while eating out with his girlfriend. The two were celebrating their three-month anniversary with a special dinner. Tragically, peanuts in the meal sent the young man into anaphylaxis. The incident was especially shocking for his parents, because they said doctors reassured them when their son was a toddler that he would outgrow his mild peanut allergy. He had never had an allergic reaction, they said. Read details here….

Waitress dies after eating dessert

Posted by SB Anderson on November 18th, 2004

A Massachusetts woman, age 22, died after eating a dessert at the restaurant where she worked as a waitress. The well-liked young woman knew about her allergy to peanuts, but didn’t know that this particular dessert had peanuts in it. Very sad story, which does not mention if she had access to an Epi-Pen. Read details here