Archive for June, 2006

Peanut allergies can be lethal

Posted by SB Anderson on June 26th, 2006

FromEastern Pennsylvania & Western New Jersey’s WFMZ-TV Online: “Go into any school in the Lehigh Valley and you’ll find children with an allergy to peanuts. It’s a dangerous problem and studies show 50 to 100 people die each year from the allergy. As Nancy Werteen tells us, doctors say those most at risk are children. Nancy: Five-year-old Tiana came to the hospital after eating a banana nut muffin. She is allergic to peanuts. For some kids, exposure to even a few molecules of peanuts can create a very dangerous situation. Lonnie King, M.D.Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta ‘There are some children who are so sensitive to it that just, of, eating the M&Ms that are, plain M&Ms that are made in the same factory as the peanut M&Ms, they’ll have a reaction.” Read more here.

Canadian study: accidental peanut exposure down

Posted by SB Anderson on June 23rd, 2006

From PRNewswire.com: “Accidental ingestion of peanut rates may be down for people suffering from peanut allergies, but there’s still room for improvement, according to a new study. The study, entitled ‘Accidental ingestions in children with peanut allergy,’ can be found in the Articles in Press area of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JACI) Web site located at http://sev.prnewswire.com/health-care-hospitals/20060615/CGTH00615062006-1.html# . The JACI is the peer-reviewed journal of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI).” Read more here.

Another story on this topic from HealthDayNews.com

New therapy may mean less restrictions for celiac disease

Posted by SB Anderson on June 23rd, 2006

A press release from EurekaAlert.com: “Scientists have discovered what may be a successful non-dietary therapy for celiac sprue, an inherited inflammatory disorder of the small intestine that impacts an estimated 1 in 200 people around the world. Two research studies, published in the June issue of Chemistry and Biology, pave the way for clinical testing with an oral enzyme therapy that may prevent the many symptoms and complications of this widespread disease.” Read more here.

Can deadly peanut allergies be cured?

Posted by SB Anderson on June 23rd, 2006

From ABC News: “Just being in the same room as peanuts can send Liam Park into a violent allergy attack. And yet, the 4-year-old from Charlotte, N.C., intentionally eats peanut flour every day. Liam is part of a potentially groundbreaking study at Duke Medical Center aimed at finding out whether children with peanut allergies can be desensitized to peanuts and eventually cured of their ailment altogether.” Read more here.

Proposed law banning Fluffernutter prompts backlash

Posted by SB Anderson on June 23rd, 2006

From Boston, Massachusett’s The Enterprise: “Adam Wilder, a 5-year-old student at the Raymond School in Brockton, likes Fluffernutters, sandwiches filled with peanut butter and Marshmallow Fluff. ‘He and my daughter eat it (Fluff) with a spoon,’ his mother Amy Wilder, of Brockton, said. But if a state senator has his way, students in Brockton and across the state will have less opportunity to sink their teeth into the sandwich spread that’s a popular school cafeteria offering.” Read more here.

Tracking peanut allergy onset in children

Posted by SB Anderson on June 23rd, 2006

From Emaxhealth.com: “About 20 percent of babies with eczema or milk and egg allergies will develop an allergy to peanuts by age five, studies show. Duke University Medical Center researchers are now enrolling infants into a trial to study how and when peanut allergies arise in children.” Read more here.

Tennessee governor gives nod to model for food allergy management in schools

Posted by SB Anderson on June 20th, 2006

A press release on Biz.yahoo.com: “Six weeks ago, Travis Moths, a 10-year-old from Blount County was asked to be a special guest and push the button when Senator Raymond Finney voted for Senate Bill 2883 regarding food allergies and schools. Today, Moths assisted Governor Phil Bredesen in signing the Anaphylaxis Management Act of 2006 at 3 p.m. central at the Old Supreme Court Building in Nashville while holding the Governor’s hand. The act requires Tennessee schools to provide a safe environment for those students with severe food allergies and anaphylaxis. Moths, the son of Tom and Kellie Moths, will be a fifth grader at Carpenter’s Elementary School this fall and is allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, and shellfish.” Read more here.

Camp accomodates peanut-allergic campers

Posted by SB Anderson on June 20th, 2006

From Michigan’s Grand Rapid Press: “Rhonda Brink bought 50 loaves of bread, then read the label on the bag and sent them all away for off-site storage. Turns out, the bread was made with peanut oil. And that means it was off-limits last week at Camp Roger.” Read more here.

Parents ask schools to kick food out of classrooms

Posted by SB Anderson on June 18th, 2006

From Massachusetts’ MetroWestDailyNews.com: “A group of local parents is calling on school officials to kick food out of classrooms to protect children from potentially deadly allergic reactions. ‘It’s just not worth risking a kid’s life for a cupcake,’ said resident Jennifer Glazer in an interview. ‘I believe food should be out of the classroom.’ In a letter to the School Committee, Glazer and five other parents called on officials to adopt a formal food allergy policy and ban food from classroom parties and activities.” Read more here.

Almost half of FA teens in study admitted to risky choices

Posted by SB Anderson on June 17th, 2006

From Forbes Magazine: “Many teens with food allergies are gambling with their lives by not carrying their medications with them and by eating foods they know can be risky, researchers report. Only 61 percent of subjects in the study said they always carried their dose of epinephrine, a self-injected drug used during severe allergic reactions. Another 54 percent said they sometimes intentionally ate potentially unsafe foods. The main reason for both these behaviors: peer pressure.” Read the details here.